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{this moment}

Post-Concert Handsome

Soulemama: {this moment} – A Friday ritual. A single photo – no words – capturing a moment from the week. A simple, special, extraordinary moment. A moment I want to pause, savor and remember.

 

{this moment}

Soulemama: {this moment} – A Friday ritual. A single photo – no words – capturing a moment from the week. A simple, special, extraordinary moment. A moment I want to pause, savor and remember.

Bright Hair Boy

{this moment}

Soulemama: {this moment} – A Friday ritual. A single photo – no words – capturing a moment from the week. A simple, special, extraordinary moment. A moment I want to pause, savor and remember.Climbing Amongst the Wood

Express Yourself!

With strains of Madonna’s song floating through our heads now, let me explain. My boy is definitely a tween. At 12, he is finding a way with his own style. For instance, for school he got some converse in a bright blue that he absolutely loves. He especially likes to pair them with a trench coat he finally got after dreaming about one for the past year or two.

His Favorite Shoes Ever

His most recent style request was to get “highlights” by which he meant a streak of color in his hair.

Ready for the Bleach!

How could I say no to those eyes? Or this face?

He says "Oh yeah!"

I didn’t. I agreed with enthusiasm. And so this past weekend my boy got his “highlights” It involved bleach, lots of foil and sitting and the color itself, of course.

Amusing Himself Hair Bleached

When he gets his haircut, L3 gets all manner of focused and serious and holds very still. I call it haircut mode and am amused by it since he has ADHD and holding still is not the norm for him.

Hair Color Done

I’m anxious for him to come home from school today to see how things went with his new hair color. I hope he still loves it as much as when he left this morning.

Julia, if you’re reading, thank you so much! He was grinning and preening all weekend. 

Certainty

What does certainty me to me? My concept of this term has changed, evolved, matured as I have. From the moment we are born we are moving toward what many people consider the ultimate certainty, death. Scattered between are moments of conviction in the constant crescendos and decrescendo of our lives.

As I sat down to write this essay, I reviewed my own life trying to recall instances where I was certain about a personal decision, a situation I was involved in, or information I had been given. When I looked these memories over I found that the certitudes of childhood gave way to adolescent assurances which have been followed by firmness in my beliefs tempered by maturity.

As a little girl I believed the warm cocoon of family life would continue unchanged. My parents would never age and they would always have the right answers to my questions. Sometime during my journey through adolescence, however, my parents were evidently struck by a strange disease which transformed them. In my eyes they suddenly appeared and acted as though they were one hundred years old. Likewise their capacity to furnish correct answers disappeared overnight. When I married I knew I would never make the same mistakes my parents had made with me. I was going to be the perfect mom.  WRONG!!!

That “bubble” of certainty has been broken over and over again during the years since I gave birth to my son and daughter. My parents have regained their former wisdom and I seem to be closing the gap with them a a frightening pace. “Certainty” has come full circle for me. I must continually remind myself that nothing but my faith in God should be a foregone conclusion.

–Lynda L. L.P. (aka, my mother), 3.15.1995

Every year on this date I like to do something to remember my mother’s life on the anniversary of her death. This year I felt the urge to pull out an essay she wrote for college. She had begun to take a class here and there while I was in college. I can remember her worrying over the pieces she was writing.  It’s no wonder where I get my own perfectionistic tendencies. :) At this point in my life I find her words particularly poignant as I struggle with how best to parent my son as he heads into adolescence. There have been many times since she died that I have wished I could ask her for advice or just wished that I could talk to her about parenting, about life. I think as my son’s drive for autonomy increases, I feel her absence more keenly than when my children were wee babes. I want to ask, “Mom, how did you do it? How did you make it through with my brother and I and still be so loving, so supportive toward us?” Perhaps her essay is a clue as to how she would answer my me.

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Mom & I, August 1997

This is the last picture that was taken of us together before she died on Nov 5, 1997. It’s poor quality and not a great shot, but I have it framed nonetheless.

{this moment}

Soulemama: {this moment} – A Friday ritual. A single photo – no words – capturing a moment from the week. A simple, special, extraordinary moment. A moment I want to pause, savor and remember.

IMG_3679.jpg

{this moment}

Soulemama: {this moment} – A Friday ritual. A single photo – no words – capturing a moment from the week. A simple, special, extraordinary moment. A moment I want to pause, savor and remember.

Beautiful afternoon to walk the labyrinth at work with the kids.

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Random contemplation for today: The difference between a to-do list on which I cross items off versus a to-do list from which I erase things. My conclusion was that I prefer to cross-off items. Why? When I look at the crossed off list it *feels* like something has been accomplished, I can see it. When I erase and the list is gone I just don’t feel as good about what was done. Weird? Maybe. But totally and absolutely me. I’m good with that. (I guess I’m not happy enough that the task has been completed!)

How about you, what kind of to-do list do you prefer? Maybe you’re an electronic list-maker? Or do you still stick to paper? Do you just skip the to-do list all together? Please dish, I’m fascinated by this topic.

The practice of late? Getting myself out to my garden that I love so much.  Once the semester begins so many things in my life seem to go to the back burner, at least for the first few weeks.  Proof:

Oops. Guess I missed these two.

Really I guess you could say my practice is just finding a groove for the new school year. I’ve been pouring so much of myself into class prep, now it’s time to even that out a bit.

How about you? What does your September look like?

{this moment}

Soulemama: {this moment} – A Friday ritual. A single photo – no words – capturing a moment from the week. A simple, special, extraordinary moment. A moment I want to pause, savor and remember.

Untitled

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